Portland Century Bike Ride in Oregon
 

Why Ride a Fundraising Ride

Let’s clear a few things up, first.

1) Not all supported bike rides are fundraising rides.

2) Forget the term “Charity Ride,” which sounds like someone’s begging for money. Fundraising rides aren’t charity; they’re much more uplifting and empowering than that. And begging is not an effective means of raising funds.

3) Often fundraising rides have a long route of 100 miles, so they’re also known as Hundos. Some people call them century rides, but we find that term rather boring.

Why Ride a Fundraising Ride

There are many great reasons to sign up for a fundraising ride this year, and they’re not all about the cause (though that’s important, too).

  • Great support – not all of them have it, but many do. Review the website and ask questions first to ensure the cost is worth it.
  • Great cause– A well run event can raise a lot of money for causes you believe in.
  • Engage your community – For some rides, you may have the option or requirement to fundraising in conjunction with your ride. We love this opportunity to engage your community (friends, coworkers, family, Facebook friends, neighbors, riding team members, etc) in bringing in big bucks for impressive causes. [It’s easy – read more]
  • Meet other riders – These rides are always so friendly! You’ll wind up talking to people at the rest stops and finish line, and even along the course. This is a fantastic way to meet like-minded folks and maybe even make a new riding buddy.
  • See new areas – Usually the course is extremely well chosen. We love rides with well marked courses so you can cruise along, take in the sights and not have to worry about too much about staying on course. To take you on quite roads, ride organizers often go out of their way to find unique roads that you wouldn’t otherwise know about. This year, we recommend signing up for at least one ride that will help you explore a new area.
  • Challenge yourself – If you’re used to commuting at least four miles to work every day, you can definitely tackle a 25 mile ride without training. And if you’re clocking upwards to 75 miles a week, you can probably even do more. If you like riding 30 mile rides on the weekend, you’re going to absolutely nail that 50 mile course. With all that said, how about training up a little for the 100 mile course (most fundraising rides have them)? We know you can do it! Sign up for a ride and commit yourself!
  • A day to remember – Big group rides are inspiring! You’ll feel the energy of the start line crowd, the excitement of having tons of other riders on course, and the sweet taste of victory at the finish line. You’ll remember the day for years to come (buy the t-shirt!), and you’ll have great stories to tell back at the office.
  • Raise awareness – Fundraising rides are a fantastic way for you to learn more about a cause. Of if you’re intimately familiar with the cause, it’s an opportunity for you to help educate others as you talk about your training, fundraising and ride experience. Keep it positive and upbeat (even though many of the causes connected to rides are serious and life threatening) to inspire others to support the cause. No matter how connected you are to the cause, use this as an educational opportunity. Smart events know that awareness-raising in conjunction with the ride is just as important as fundraising.

Why do You Ride Fundraising Rides?

Why do you sign up for fundraising rides? What rides are on your list?

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Comments
2 Responses to “Why Ride a Fundraising Ride”
  1. Billee says:

    One thing you forgot – I ride to ride with my friends. We pick a few rides, and put them on our calendars and sign up. That way, there’s no excuse not to ride together and we have a goal in mind that keeps us committed. Otherwise, it’s September and we’re still saying “we really have to get together for a ride” 🙂

  2. Theresa Jonesse says:

    I’m with Billee – I ride to ride with my friends.

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